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Upper Division Core

Transfer students with more than 30 transfer credits who have not taken ENC 1101 and 1102 at the previous institution can satisfy the first-year composition requirement by taking ENC 2304 and one of the following: ENC 3213, ENC 3249, or ENC 3311.

  • ENC 2304: College Writing for Transfer Students

    ENC 2304 introduces transfer students to various kinds of writing they will encounter at the University. Students will compose essays for a variety of purposes and audiences, and learn the conventions of academic research. Reflection about writing and writing processes is also a key component of the course. The skills taught in this class will help students in any major or career path they might choose.

    For transfer students, ENC 2304 is a prerequisite for upper-division ENC core writing classes.

    Course Outcomes

    By the end of ENC 2304, students should:

    • Compose texts that have a clear rhetorical purpose and appropriate audience;
    • Develop an effective thesis and support it with evidence;
    • Read and respond critically to various texts, including those of their peers;
    • Develop effective writing processes for completion of writing projects;
    • Use reflective writing to gauge strengths, weaknesses, and growth as writers;
    • Understand and apply rhetorical strategies and persuasive appeals;
    • Choose and incorporate citations according to academic conventions;
    • Exhibit appropriate syntax, grammar, punctuation, and spelling.

    Texts

    • Lunsford, Andrea. The Everyday Writer. Boston: Bedford/St. Martin’s. 4th edition, 2009. Customized for Florida International University.
    • Ramage, John, John Bean and June Johnson. The Allyn & Bacon Guide to Writing. New York: Pearson, 2010. Customized for Florida International University. Fourth Edition.
  • ENC 3213: Professional and Technical Writing

    ENC 3213 introduces students to the expectations of writing in the workplace and explores the ways in which technology and media help shape professional communication. Students will hone their writing skills and study audience analysis, persuasion strategies, ethics, and working collaboratively. While students will practice communicating using traditional business genres such as memos, employment correspondence, reports, and proposals, they will also develop skills in document design, effective use of graphics, and oral presentation. Assignment topics are based on the students’ major, career goals, and interests.

    Course Outcomes

    By the end of ENC 3213, students will:

    • Produce documents in a variety of professional genres such as memos, proposals, and analytical reports;
    • Produce documents that respond to the needs of multiple audiences, including international/global audiences;
    • Develop document designs that maximize effectiveness for the audience and purpose;
    • Create effective multimedia presentations;
    • Conduct and incorporate primary and secondary research to support rhetorical aims;
    • Appropriately adapt tone, style, and content depending on audience, purpose and genre;
    • Write clearly and concisely, with grammar and usage appropriate to the rhetorical situation.
  • ENC 3249: Professional and Technical Writing for Computing

    ENC 3249 introduces students to the expectations of workplace writing within computer science fields and explores the ways in which technology and media help shape professional communication. Students will hone their writing skills and study audience analysis, persuasion strategies, ethics, and working collaboratively. While students will practice communicating using traditional business genres such as memos, employment correspondence, reports, and proposals, they will also develop skills in document design, effective use of graphics, and oral presentation. Assignment topics are based on the students’ major, career goals, and interests.

    Course Outcomes

    By the end of ENC 3249, students will:

    • Produce documents in a variety of professional genres such as memos, proposals, and analytical reports;
    • Produce documents that respond to the needs of multiple audiences, including international/global audiences;
    • Develop document designs that maximize effectiveness for the audience and purpose;
    • Create effective multimedia presentations;
    • Conduct and incorporate primary and secondary research to support rhetorical aims;
    • Appropriately adapt tone, style, and content depending on audience, purpose and genre;
    • Write clearly and concisely, with grammar and usage appropriate to the rhetorical situation.
  • ENC 3311: Advanced Writing and Research

    ENC 3311 focuses on presenting and designing advanced research, critical response, and argumentation. Students report and develop their primary and secondary research in various formats, including argumentative and investigative essays, reports, and proposals. Students are encouraged to follow their research interests, to improve writing and research abilities, and to engage in critical inquiry. The course presents a series of small writing/research assignments (such as a proposal, a progress report, synthesis of previous research, field notes, summaries, etc.), leading into a longer researched essay of 12-15 pages.

    Course Outcomes

    By the end of ENC 3311, students will:

    • Generate meaningful and relevant research questions;
    • Design and follow an effective research plan;
    • Demonstrate advanced ability to evaluate and analyze internet, library database, and print sources;
    • Conduct primary research (as needed) based on observations and interviews;
    • Effectively incorporate primary and secondary research into their writing, using appropriate documentation;
    • Produce documents that present research clearly and effectively, to a variety of audiences, rhetorical purposes, and genres;
    • Continue to refine their writing process, learning to revise their work according to self-assessment and reader responses;
    • Improve their writing style (word choice, syntax, and sentence structure) beyond first-year levels.